Careers, Podcasts

Podcast – Supporting Early Career Researchers, ISTAART & UCL Survey Launch

Hosted by Dr Anna Volkmer

Reading Time: 44 minutes

Early career researchers face many challenges – from difficulties finding, funding, publishing and career progression to problems with research culture and individual forms of prejudice.

University College London and the Alzheimer’s Association International Society to Advance Alzheimer’s Research and Treatment (ISTAART) Professional Interest Area to Elevate Early Career Researchers (PEERS) is working to better understand the challenges and what helps.

In this podcast Dr Anna Volkmer talks with five members of the ISTAART PIA to Elevate Early Career Researchers. Discussing their work, and their newly launched survey. This weeks guests are Dr Beth Shaaban, Dr Sara Bartels, Wagner Brum, Dr Lindsay Welikovitch.

The survey discussed is aimed at early career dementia researchers, or those who have previously been an early career dementia researcher but have left the field. We hope you can take a time to help!

Complete the Survey

It asks questions about you and your research, how you are supported in your field, for your perceptions on how opportunities and support could be improved, and about the research culture that you work within (Please note please note this does include some sensitive questions relating to gender / ethnicity, and asks some questions which may be upsetting e.g. Your experiences of certain types of bullying or prejudice etc.).

The results of this survey will be published to help institutions and research funders, to understand the thoughts of early career dementia researchers. The results will also be used to guide the development of future ISTAART programs and resources, and be shared with the World Dementia Council.

The closing date for this survey is 31st October 2021


Click here to read a full transcript of this podcast in English 🇬🇧

Voice Over:

Welcome to the NIHR dementia researcher podcast brought to you by dementiaresearcher.nihr.ac.uk in association with Alzheimer’s Research UK and Alzheimer’s Society supporting early career dementia researchers across the world.

Dr Anna Volkmer:

Hello, I’m Dr. Anna Volkmer and I am delighted to be back in the hot seat hosting this week’s dementia researcher podcast. Now, last year, I hosted a show with the team behind the new ISTAART PIA to elevate early career researchers, a new group that sat under the Alzheimer’s association umbrella. Their mission was to create an interactive supportive global network to foster, develop and support early career dementia researchers.

Dr Anna Volkmer:

Today I’m delighted to be once again joined by five members of their executive committee to discuss the progress they’ve made and to discuss the launch of their new dementia ECR global survey. So I’m delighted to introduce Dr. Beth Shaaban, Dr. Sara Bartels, Dr. Lindsey Welikovitch, Wagner Brum, and of course, the person that you’re all very familiar with, our very own Adam Smith who chairs the group. And I’m going to ask everyone to say hello, so let’s start with some introductions. Can you tell us about yourself, Beth?

Dr Beth Shaaban:

Sure. I’m Beth Shaaban and I am new faculty in the department of epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh. My research involves looking at sex and gender differences and sex and gender specific risk for the pathway from cerebral small vessel disease to Alzheimer’s disease pathology.

Dr Anna Volkmer:

Thank you, Beth. How about Sara?

Dr Sara Bartels:

Hi, Anna. Nice to be here. Yeah, my name is Sara Bartels. I’m originally from Germany. I have a background in Europe psychology, and last year I finished my PhD in the Netherlands, which focused on technology and dementia, and specifically the use of digital diaries to understand and support the every day life of people with cognitive impairments and their caregivers.

Dr Sara Bartels:

Now I work both as a postdoc for Maastricht University still remotely, and for Karolinska Institute here in Sweden, working on psychosocial interventions for people with complex health issues, such as dementia, but also chronic pain. And within the PEERs PIA I have the role of the continental lead Europe. And it’s great to be here today. Thank you.

Dr Anna Volkmer:

How about you, Lindsay? Tell us a little bit about yourself.

Dr Lindsay Welikovitch:

Yeah, sure thing. So I recently graduated from McGill University with my PhD, and I’m not sure if I can call myself a new postdoc within the first few months, but I’m transitioning out of new postdoc and I worked on, I do basic research. So I primarily study how microglia mediate the interaction between amyloid and tau pathology. And I’m currently at Massachusetts General Hospital. Yeah. I’m really looking forward to discussing the survey with everyone obviously. And like Sara, I also operate as the North American lead.

Dr Anna Volkmer:

What a variety of exciting research. So Wagner, tell us a bit about your research and about yourself.

Wagner Brum:

Yeah, sure. So my name is Wagner Brum. I’m from Brazil and I’m doing my medical degree concurrently with a PhD in biochemistry in Brazil, doing more biomarker focus research. And right now I’m doing part of my PhD here at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, and both here and in Brazil my research mainly focuses in understanding Seward biomarkers and how they reflect Alzheimer’s disease, pathophysiology, and how they can aid in decision-making. And within the PEERs PIA, I am the South America representative, and I’m very happy to be here with you all to discuss our survey and the goals of our PIA.

Dr Anna Volkmer:

Fantastic. So last but not least, we’ve got Adam. You want to tell the listeners about you?

Adam Smith:

Hi Anna, thank you very much for having me on the show. So I’m Adam Smith. I’m a program director at University College, London. I’m funded by the NIHR and our office and myself…various bits of work on our plates. We are leading some national work to try and improve early career dementia researcher supports. We also develop things like joint dementia research for public engagement. We do our own research as well, and I have the pleasure of chairing the ISTAART PIA to elevate early career researchers for the Alzheimer’s association.

Dr Anna Volkmer:

Fantastic. And that’s what it’s all about. So what I’m really now interested in is the work you’re currently doing. So Beth, could I maybe start with you and ask you quickly to remind our listeners what the ISTAART is and how the PIAs fits into that? And then I’m going to ask some of the others about the project that we want to discuss today.

Dr Beth Shaaban:

Absolutely. So ISTAART is the international society to advance Alzheimer’s research and treatment. It’s a professional society of the Alzheimer’s association for research scientists, physicians, and other dementia professionals who are active in Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia’s research. They convene a number of meetings throughout the year. So perhaps most well-known to the listeners would be the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference or AAIC. And that just took place in July.

Dr Beth Shaaban:

This year, it was held as a hybrid model of in-person and virtual attendance and presentations, and then of particular interest to early career researchers, they’re also holding Neuroscience Next from October 12th to 13th. And this is a virtual conference which is free to attend, planned by early career researchers for early career researchers and highlighting early career researchers. It’ll offer a great mix of both scientific and career development sessions.

Dr Beth Shaaban:

And then to pull it back to the PIAs – the PIA’s are professional interest areas. They’re special interest groups where researchers from around the world collaborate on everything from supporting researchers like what our PIA does, and it’s short nickname is PEERS, all the way to understanding dementia and contributing factors to interventions, to prove dementia outcomes. So a wide array of things that our PIA’s are working on.

Dr Anna Volkmer:

That’s brilliant. That’s really helpful actually as an ECR myself, I have to confess, it took me a while, I kind of organically got to know what a nice…what ISTAART was. And so that was a really neat summary. Thank you. And I like the new title PEERS, that’s it, that’s really great.

Dr Anna Volkmer:

So Adam, I mentioned in my introduction that we’ve got a sense of the overall aims of the PEERS PIA, but can you tell us about these big project the group’s been working on please?

Adam Smith:

Our big exciting projects and I feel always slightly like an imposter because I’m probably like the oldest person in all of the early career researcher thing. I miss like fake ECR outside of us. That’s imposing myself on early career researchers.

Adam Smith:

But so when we started our PIA, one of the things that we really wanted to do was to make sure that we provided some real practical, practical, help and support, not just be somebody else just adding to the space of things that early career researchers had to kind of be aware of. And I think…so we had some ideas about what needed to be done, but we recognize that the challenges early career researchers they face and the help that they need, isn’t always the same. It differs in different parts of the world. It changes at different career stages. It depends on the different field of research that you work in.

Adam Smith:

And I think we wanted to make sure…a bit like my…in my day job, I worked for dementia researcher. We wanted to make sure we could help everybody, whether you’re working in fundamental science or care research. So we have this idea where there was common themes, but knew everybody probably needed different help at different challenges. So we wanted to engage and listen to what the community had to say and what the problems were, and also get a sense of what support was already out there.

Adam Smith:

And as you would expect, as a group of researchers we’re rather data driven and a survey came in because everybody loves a good…another survey! But this is slightly different. So this is where the survey came in, because I think by undertaking this survey across the world, we can listen to what the challenges early career researchers face, start to get a sense of what support they receive in different parts of the world, where the blockages are with their careers, what the real problems are. So we don’t just hear what the challenges are, but also what’s been doing and done well. And then we can take the results of this, combine it with some other work, which Sara will talk about to try and both steer our own support offerings, but also as well then to produce guidance for research institutions and funders, so that they can hopefully better improve their own policies to support what ECRs really need.

Adam Smith:

And Deborah Oliveira also from Brazil who worked in Nottingham as well, did a great paper which was quite inspiring last year, where she kind of got a sense as to start in this work. And I think it came at a time when we were looking at this as well.

Adam Smith:

So the survey comes out today. Lindsay is going to talk about the survey as well, but that’s the kind of real inspiration and that’s why people should do it. I think by completing the survey, we’ll make an actual difference to the support we provide in future and hopefully inform some guidance and improve the environment we all work within.

Dr Anna Volkmer:

That’s great. And it’s almost a person centered survey to apply some of that dementia care talk. That’s exciting.

Adam Smith:

I like to think so.

Dr Anna Volkmer:

Yeah, absolutely. I mean, I think that’s..yeah..that’s a really helpful way of doing it because as you said, we’ve all come from different backgrounds, different ages, we’re at different stages, different countries. Lindsey, can you tell us a little bit more about this survey?

Dr Lindsay Welikovitch:

Yeah, for sure. So the five of us sort of put our collective brains together and we came up with every topic that one could possibly conceive, we hope. But we were really most interested in understanding which professional experiences and life circumstances lead an early career researcher to pursue a career in dementia research. And what combination of personal and professional factors might contribute to an ECR actually succeeding in their respective fields and industries. And most importantly, whether young researchers feel fulfilled in their current roles and are optimistic about their future and dementia research.

Dr Lindsay Welikovitch:

And ultimately like Adam said, our goal is to use all of this information to help guide future policy and hopefully convince the current on the next generation of students and neuroscientists and medical practitioners, that dementia research is a hugely important and worthwhile area of study to pursue.

Dr Lindsay Welikovitch:

So the five of us, I think we bring pretty unique perspectives because we’re at completely different career stages, scientific training. We have completely different personal background. None of us are from the same country. And I think Beth and Wagner and I also said that at the time that we were formulating the survey, we were in the throes of pretty significant career transition. So some of the topics sort of evolve in real time as we were experiencing them. So we can certainly sympathize with some of the participants probably as they’re going through the survey.

Dr Lindsay Welikovitch:

And then ultimately once we put together, basically every topic we could think of, we tested the survey with the rest of our executive committee and we recruited almost too many participants to sort of beta test the questionnaire. And these were dedicated ECRs who were also at completely different career stages in different parts of the world and who also speak different languages. And they provided really helpful feedback about how certain questions can be improved and suggestions for questions that we hadn’t even thought of and that we hadn’t considered. So we hope we were able to successfully integrate their feedback and suggestions. And their input was really invaluable to help us ensure that the survey was accessible as possible, and that we can extract as much useful data and information as possible from the respondents.

Dr Lindsay Welikovitch:

So like Adam said, the survey launches today and like good scientists is only successful if we have an adequate sample size and we have enough data from everybody. So, and that’s completely dependent on you. So we encourage everyone at all career stages, whether you’re just starting out at undergrad or assistant professor stage or whatever, to participate in order to help effect change, and also to encourage your colleagues to complete the survey as well.

Dr Lindsay Welikovitch:

The survey’s available on the dementia researcher website, I was debating whether or not to actually spell out the URL but I won’t. If you just go to the dementia researcher, a URL, and at the end, just put a forward slash and survey, you’ll be able to find it easily hopefully.

Dr Lindsay Welikovitch:

So, I’m really looking forward to seeing what respondents come back. Hopefully we’ve covered all areas. I think people will find that we have. So, yeah.

Dr Anna Volkmer:

And how long…the big question is…how long will it take people? People are listening and thinking, gosh, I want to do it, but I’m pressed for time. How long do they need?

Dr Lindsay Welikovitch:

Sure. So we carefully sculpted this survey such that there were no redundant questions and that people’s answers would dictate what questions would come afterwards. So it should take like 20, 25 minutes, we hope. Yeah. And it’s…I mean, to us, it looked like a lot, but like we said, we tried to sculpt it down as much as possible so that it was pretty easy for people to do. So should only take 20, 25 minutes. And if you want to pause it and come back, I believe it’s a feature as well. So if you’re in the lab, you just want to do it quickly, that’s also a possibility.

Adam Smith:

Yeah. It took us nine months to come up with the questions. This hasn’t been a survey we just quickly churned out a week ago. I think we did…did we start work on this in January? It feels-

Dr Lindsay Welikovitch:

Don’t tell them how the sausage is made, Adam!

Adam Smith:

Sorry!

Wagner Brum:

20 minutes is like an instant compared to-

Adam Smith:

Yeah, it’s a short time, there’s a lot of thought in it. But I think you made a really good point there, Anna and Lindsey. And Anna, as a communications expert, you’re wrestling about the different languages, trying to make sure that you could also arrive at a form of words that would make sense whether you were reading this in Brazil or Australia or in Europe or the US. It was quite tricky.

Dr Anna Volkmer:

And we were just debating about translation, weren’t we? About actually, that’s tricky, but from what I understand at the moment, it’s all in English. Oh, that’s really helpful. So it’s in English. It’s 20 minutes. You can pause it and restart it. Please go and do it. Cause you guys have done such a thorough, thorough job. But Sara, Adam mentioned that the survey was just one piece of work that’s going to contribute to the guidance you’re all hoping to produce. So tell us about the policy work that you’re leading on.

Dr Sara Bartels:

The survey is a bit like bottom up and the policy work is top down if you want to compare it that way. So we aim to identify what kind of policy plans and strategies are out there around the world to support early career research researchers in the field of dementia. First, we will see if a country has a dementia plan or strategy or not, and then also identify the largest dementia funding bodies.

Dr Sara Bartels:

And secondly, we will then review, do they specifically support early career researchers ECRs, or are they broader for research in general for a specific topic? And the idea is then to provide a best practice guide potentially together with the World Dementia Council and other organizations to identify best practice and improve the field. Also from the top-down perspective, we know of course, early career life is in many fields difficult, but maybe there are some good examples out there that we can support and then circulate around the globe through this policy work.

Dr Anna Volkmer:

So are there any countries that you know of already that have these kinds of dementia strategies in place?

Dr Sara Bartels:

A resource that I identified that was really helpful to start with…we’re just starting this project up now, it’s very early stages, was the ultimate Europe website. They have an overview of the European countries and the strategies. And there, I saw that a couple of countries actually don’t have strategies – Estonia, Latvia, Turkey. They don’t have dementia strategies and therefore I’m not sure how the early career researchers are supported in these countries. Maybe they have other support systems that we can identify, but for now it’s really yeah, it’s a very interesting topic to look into and to see what’s going on around the world.

Dr Anna Volkmer:

Absolutely. And that’s why I’m guessing it would be so helpful to get the survey distributed to all these countries that you’re…that you’ve just named.

Dr Anna Volkmer:

But now Wagner, you mentioned you’re from, originally from Brazil and South America is one of the places that really seems to be contributing a lot of the dementia research field. How do you think that the work of your PIA and policy work like this can actually help ECRs?

Wagner Brum:

So yeah, I really think that South America has been contributing a lot to dementia research recently. I mean, just now in AAIC, we had the plenary with Professor Nitrini. But we also know other countries of South America, for instance we have Professor Miia Kivipelto in Argentina doing the FINGER study. And for instance, Professor Yakeel Quiroz despite being in Boston, leads an amazing work with the Colombian families affected by Alzheimer’s.

Wagner Brum:

So for us that are always reading and engaging with mostly European and North American literature it’s really nice to also actually be and feel that South America is also starting to play into the picture. And I think that our PIA can really make a difference in that sense, because I mean, in my experience, what I felt really made a difference in my career as an early career researcher is to be connected with what’s happening in the international research community and to be connected with PEERS in the international research community.

Wagner Brum:

I mean, when I joined my lab in 2018, they were discussing the guideline that came out this year, in that year. So, for instance, when we are in non Europe or North American countries, it’s even more of an effort for you not to be restricted to national publications and journals and literature, and actually keep up with what’s happening in other places. So for me, knowing what was happening was crucial. And then we kept on working in that direction.

Wagner Brum:

And then in AAIC 19, I just felt a part of something when I got there. I mean, we were studying what was happening. We were doing research in that line and there was a bunch of other people doing the same. So I think that even when Adam invited me to be a part of the PIA, I felt like this is something that I believe in because connecting with the research community and connecting with what’s happening is what changed the game for me as an early career researcher.

Wagner Brum:

So I really hope that we can do that with PEERS so we are thinking of many ways that we can help the early career researcher community with action. So first we think like in the obvious pandemic era, things that we can do, for instance like webinars, we are doing a series of methods, webinars to engage early career researchers to share your experiences.

Wagner Brum:

And of course we will have the opportunity and now there’s the survey that we are all hoping that everyone can help in completing and asking their colleagues to complete to understand what kind of more need-based actions we can take.

Wagner Brum:

And for instance, from a South America perspective, something that I do know that…it’s something that can be invested even more on, but that will, for sure, see that’s something that’s working is for instance, the travel fellowships. Because everyone that’s in South America makes advantage and has travel fellowships to go to other conferences and to connect. I’m sure that they all think that this is the thing that makes all the difference. So it’s that kind of thing that we want to know, like what’s working and what’s… we can even put more energy and funding on so we can connect everyone.

Dr Anna Volkmer:

Yeah. Networking connections are the key, aren’t they? I’m curious with the survey, we’ve spoken about South American, we’ve spoken about Europe – are there any other countries or continents that you’re particularly keen to get respondents from? Or have you not talked about that particularly?

Adam Smith:

It’s tricky, isn’t it? I mean, because I think proportionally of course there are, I think you’d like some proportional representation from across the world. I’d expect a bigger response from the US clearly where there are more researchers and then Europe. But I think there’s…because there’s different things happening in different parts of the world. We know that research in Nigeria or in China and Australia has a different focus and emphasis to perhaps elsewhere in the world.

Adam Smith:

So no, I think it’s really important that we try to get contributions. And as I said, this isn’t just finding out what the problems are for researchers in New Zealand compared to Europe, although that in itself is interesting. But I think I’m really wanting to know what isn’t a problem for somebody. So, there aren’t the same bottlenecks perhaps in Australia compared to the US which allows us to change our guidance. And it might be actually that the output of this isn’t a single piece of guidance. I know Beth’s going to talk about this in a minute, but actually it allows us to define what support is needed in different parts of the world, and then be able to respond to that. And hopefully as a global organization, Alzheimer’s Association and our PIA, we’re able to respond to that.

Dr Anna Volkmer:

And then I guess to put in my tuppence worth, I’d be keen to disseminate this to researchers coming from the kind of healthcare world into research. Because I think that maybe there certainly are different bottlenecks, just for example, the AAIC, I don’t think there were more than a handful of speech and language therapists, which is my discipline, who attended and yet Wagner has just spoken how it’s a really wonderful way of connecting with people, almost your family of people who are all doing the same research.

Dr Anna Volkmer:

And so yeah, I think it’d be really interesting to read the results, but Beth, what other things does your PIA plan to do over the coming year, other than this survey?

Dr Beth Shaaban:

Yeah, I think this also ties in very nicely with what you and Adam were just talking about with responses from around the world. So we’ve been very intentional on our…when we were forming our executive committee last year, so that we have a representative from each continent outside of Antarctica. And we think that’s really important because we’re excited that these continent leads can really help us roll things out with the survey in their part of the world, and they’ll know more locally, what are other professional associations that we might connect with and what the needs of the early career investigators are in that area?

Dr Beth Shaaban:

So we’re exciting…we’re excited about the continent leads actually in the next year, convening continent working groups. And we think this will really allow us to better tailor the resources that we provide to early career researchers.

Dr Beth Shaaban:

We’re also excited about one of the things that Wagner mentioned. So our webinars series called the Methods Club. For each Methods Club, we identify a research or analytic method of interest to early career dementia researchers. And each webinar is chaired by a non expert who really wants to get to learn more about the topic because we feel that they will know what questions to ask and what words won’t be understood by everyone in attendance. We have two to three presentations from early career researchers, and then we include one to two seasoned experts in the area so that they can help answer the questions and provide feedback to the presenters.

Dr Beth Shaaban:

So we already held the one, I think Wagner mentioned it, it was about bio fluid biomarkers. It was very well attended. I will say that there was very heavy interest from Asia, from China. We know it was very well attended there. And so there is an appetite for more resources like this. And you heard from Sara about the policy review. And then finally we’re interested in developing some more career support specifically through a career support blog and improvements in the career center on ISTAARTS website. So those are the things that we’re excited about this next year.

Dr Anna Volkmer:

They are exciting. They sound like things that I could benefit from. I’ll be-

Dr Beth Shaaban:

I know. We selfishly want to benefit from these ourselves too.

Dr Anna Volkmer:

Yeah, absolutely. I’ll be at those methods workshops and I’ll be following the career support stuff.

Dr Anna Volkmer:

And now we are actually almost out of time, but Adam, we’ve talked about a lot of this today, and I just want us to hone in on the key points. Remind us of the main takeaways that you want our listeners to act on right now.

Adam Smith:

Okay. So simply go to dementiaresearcher.nihr.ac.uk/survey and complete our survey. We need as many people as from across the world to do this at all career stages, both people working in dementia research now, or if you have done but have for some reason chosen to leave within the last two years…cause I think we want to understand why people left as well. And this is from all areas from people working on an MSC or a PhD postdocs, as Lindsay explained, right through to kind of junior professors I think.

Adam Smith:

Go to the survey dementiaresearcher/survey and complete that. There’s no reward I’m afraid other than the knowledge that you’ve helped. We will of course be publishing the results as well in an academic journal. So we will aim to publish the results as soon as possible. And they will, your views will really matter and go on to inform that guidance.

Adam Smith:

Join our ISTAART PIA of course, as well. If you go to ISTAART you get attendance at the Neuroscience Next conference that has been mentioned today as well. That’s free for ISTAART members. You can join our PIA and access all the webinars. There are literally dozens of webinars every week and all the recordings because nobody has time to attend that many webinars, but you also get things like…you get access to Alzheimer’s and dementia, I think free as well and various other benefits. So do join our PIA.

Adam Smith:

There’s going to be opportunities to get involved in these continent working groups that was mentioned before. So wherever you are in the world, there will be a place for you on one of our continent working groups, whatever field of discovery you work in as well. So do join ISTAART and our PIA and there’ll be a call out for those memberships, I’m sure, in one of our newsletters before Christmas. So that’s the main, I think, takeaways and do let us know if you want to be involved. We hope the results will be useful

Dr Anna Volkmer:

Then say, the incentive is to do the survey and pay it forward and that will help others in the future. That’s really great. Thank you, Adam.

Dr Anna Volkmer:

And for everyone listening, all the links you will need will be included in the text that comes with the show. So I think this is all we have time for today. Thank you again to our guests, Beth, Sara, Lindsay, Wagner and Adam. We have all today’s panelists on the website, including details of their Twitter accounts. So please do take a look.

Dr Anna Volkmer:

Finally, please remember to like, subscribe in whichever app you’re listening in and remember to visit the dementia researcher website, where we publish new content every day from careers and science blogs, job listings, funding calls, and events, and so much more. Oh, and my own blogs too, one recently on moving on with my own career. So it’s been lovely hearing about all the tips and hints that you’ve been sharing today. Now that’s it for now. Have a great day. Thanks everybody

Voice Over:

Brought to you by dementiaresearcher.nihr.ac.uk in association with Alzheimer’s Research UK and Alzheimer’s Society supporting early career dementia researchers across the world.

END

Clique aqui para ler a transcrição completa deste blog e podcast em português 🇧🇷

Pesquisadores em início de carreira enfrentam muitos desafios – desde dificuldades em encontrar financiamento, publicação e progressão na carreira até problemas com a cultura de pesquisa e formas individuais de preconceito.

A University College de Londres, a Alzheimer’s Association International Society to Advance Alzheimer’s Research and Treatment (ISTAART) e a Professional Interest Area to Elevate Early Career Researchers (PEERS) estão trabalhando para entender melhor os desafios e o que pode ajudar pesquisadores de demência em início de carreira.

Neste podcast, a Dra. Anna Volkmer fala com cinco membros do ISTAART PIA to Elevate Early Career Researcher pra discutir seu trabalho e sua pesquisa recém-lançada. Os convidados desta semana são a Dra. Beth Shaaban , a Dra. Sara Bartels , Wagner Brum , e a Dra. Lindsay Welikovitch .

A pesquisa discutida é destinada a pesquisadores de demência em início de carreira, ou aqueles que já foram pesquisadores de demência em início de carreira, mas deixaram o campo. Esperamos que você dedique um tempo para ajudar!

Complete a pesquisa – até 31 de outubro de 2021 https://www.dementiaresearcher.nihr.ac.uk/survey

A pesquisa abrange perguntas sobre você e sua pesquisa, como você é apoiado em sua área, suas percepções sobre como oportunidades e suporte podem ser melhorados e sobre a cultura de pesquisa na qual você trabalha (observe que isto inclui algumas questões sensíveis relacionadas de gênero /etnia e faz algumas perguntas que podem ser perturbadoras, por exemplo, suas experiências de certos tipos de bullying ou preconceito, etc.).

Os resultados desta pesquisa serão publicados para ajudar as instituições e financiadores de pesquisa, a entender os pensamentos dos pesquisadores de demência em início de carreira. Os resultados também serão usados ​​para orientar o desenvolvimento de futuros programas e recursos do ISTAART, e serão compartilhados com o Conselho Mundial de Demência.

Voice Over:

Bem-vindo ao podcast do NIHR dementia researcher trazido a você por dementiaresearcher.nihr.ac.uk em associação com a Alzheimer’s Research UK e a Alzheimer’s Society, apoiando pesquisadores de demência em início de carreira em todo o mundo.

Dra. Anna Volkmer:

Olá, sou a Dra. Anna Volkmer e estou muito feliz por estar de volta à berlinda, hospedando o dementia researcher podcast desta semana. Agora, no ano passado, eu apresentei um show com a equipe por trás do novo ISTAART PIA para elevar os pesquisadores em início de carreira, um novo grupo que faz parte da Alzheimer’s Association. Sua missão era criar uma rede global de apoio interativa para promover, desenvolver e apoiar pesquisadores de demência em início de carreira.

Dra. Anna Volkmer:

Hoje estou muito feliz por ter mais uma vez a companhia de cinco membros de seu comitê executivo para discutir o progresso que eles fizeram e discutir o lançamento de sua nova pesquisa global ECR sobre demência. Portanto, tenho o prazer de apresentar a Dra. Beth Shaaban, a Dra. Sara Bartels, a Dra. Lindsey Welikovitch, Wagner Brum e, claro, a pessoa com a qual todos vocês estão familiarizados, nosso próprio Adam Smith, que preside o grupo. E vou pedir a todos que digam olá, então vamos começar com algumas apresentações. Você pode falar also sobre você, Beth?

Dra. Beth Shaaban:

Certo. Sou Beth Shaaban e sou a nova professora do departamento de epidemiologia da Universidade de Pittsburgh. Minha pesquisa envolve olhar para sexo e diferenças de gênero e risco específico de sexo e gênero para o caminho da doença dos pequenos vasos cerebrais à patologia da doença de Alzheimer.

Dra. Anna Volkmer:

Obrigada, Beth. E você Sara?

Dra. Sara Bartels:

Olá Anna. É bom estar aqui. Sim, meu nome é Sara Bartels. Eu sou originalmente da Alemanha. Tenho formação em psicologia na Europa e, no ano passado, terminei meu doutorado na Holanda, com foco em tecnologia e demência, e especificamente o uso de diários digitais para compreender e apoiar a vida cotidiana de pessoas com deficiências cognitivas e seus cuidadores.

Dra. Sara Bartels:

Agora trabalho como pós-doutorado na Maastricht University, ainda remotamente, e no Karolinska Institute, aqui na Suécia, trabalhando em intervenções psicossociais para pessoas com problemas de saúde complexos, como demência, mas também com dor crônica. E dentro dos PEERs PIA tenho o papel de líder continental da Europa. E é ótimo estar aqui hoje. Obrigada.

Dra. Anna Volkmer:

E você, Lindsay? Conte-nos um pouco sobre você.

Dra. Lindsay Welikovitch:

Sim, com certeza. Então, recentemente me formei na McGill University com meu PhD, e não tenho certeza se posso me considerar um novo pós-doutorado nos primeiros meses, mas estou saindo de um novo pós-doutorado e trabalhei, faço pesquisa básica. Portanto, estudo principalmente como a microglia medeia a interação entre a patologia amilóide e tau. E atualmente estou no Hospital Geral de Massachusetts. Sim. Estou realmente ansiosa para discutir a pesquisa com todos, obviamente. E, como Sara, também atuo como líder na América do Norte.

Dra. Anna Volkmer:

Que variedade de pesquisas empolgantes. Então, Wagner, conte-nos um pouco sobre sua pesquisa e sobre você.

Wagner Brum:

Sim claro. Então, meu nome é Wagner Brum. Eu sou do Brasil e estou fazendo minha graduação em medicina simultaneamente com um doutorado em bioquímica no Brasil, fazendo mais pesquisas com foco em biomarcadores. E agora estou fazendo parte do meu doutorado aqui na Universidade de Gotemburgo na Suécia, e tanto aqui quanto no Brasil minha pesquisa se concentra principalmente em compreender os biomarcadores de Seward e como eles refletem a doença de Alzheimer, fisiopatologia e como eles podem ajudar em tomadas de decisão. E dentro dos PEERs PIA, sou o representante da América do Sul, e estou muito feliz por estar aqui com todos vocês para discutir nossa pesquisa e os objetivos de nosso PIA.

Dra. Anna Volkmer:

Fantástico. Por último, mas não menos importante, temos Adam. Você quer contar aos ouvintes sobre você?

Adam Smith:

Oi Anna, muito obrigado por me receber no programa. Então, eu sou Adam Smith. Sou diretor de programa na University College de Londres. Sou financiado pelo NIHR, por nosso escritório e por mim…em vários trabalhos. Estamos liderando alguns trabalhos nacionais para tentar melhorar os apoios aos pesquisadores em demência no início da carreira. Também desenvolvemos coisas como pesquisa conjunta de demência para engajamento público. Também fazemos nossa própria pesquisa e tenho o prazer de presidir o ISTAART PIA para elevar pesquisadores em início de carreira para a Alzheimer Association.

Dra. Anna Volkmer:

Fantástico. E é disso que se trata. Então, o que realmente estou interessado agora é no trabalho que você está fazendo atualmente. Então, Beth, eu poderia começar com você e pedir rapidamente para lembrar aos nossos ouvintes o que é o ISTAART e como os PIAs se encaixam nele? E então vou perguntar a alguns dos outros sobre o projeto que queremos discutir hoje.

Dra. Beth Shaaban:

Absolutamente. Portanto, a ISTAART é a sociedade internacional para o avanço da pesquisa e do tratamento do Alzheimer. É uma sociedade profissional da associação de Alzheimer para cientistas pesquisadores, médicos e outros profissionais da demência que atuam na doença de Alzheimer e nas pesquisas relacionadas à demência. Eles convocam várias reuniões ao longo do ano. Portanto, talvez o mais conhecido dos ouvintes seja a Conferência Internacional da Alzheimer’s Association ou AAIC. E isso aconteceu em julho.

Dra. Beth Shaaban:

Este ano, foi realizado como um modelo híbrido de atendimento presencial e virtual e apresentações, e de particular interesse para pesquisadores em início de carreira, eles também realizarão o Neuroscience Next de 12 a 13 de outubro. E esta é uma conferência virtual de participação gratuita, planejada por pesquisadores em início de carreira para pesquisadores em início de carreira e destacando pesquisadores em início de carreira. Ele oferecerá uma grande combinação de sessões científicas e de desenvolvimento de carreira.

Dra. Beth Shaaban:

E, depois, voltando aos PIAs – os PIAs são áreas de interesse profissional. Eles são grupos de interesse especial onde pesquisadores de todo o mundo colaboram em tudo, desde apoiar pesquisadores como o que nosso PIA faz, e seu apelido curto é PEERS, todo o caminho para entender a demência e fatores que contribuem para intervenções, para provar os resultados da demência. Então, uma ampla gama de coisas nas quais nossos PIAs estão trabalhando.

Dra. Anna Volkmer:

Isso é brilhante. Isso é muito útil, na verdade, como um ECR, eu tenho que confessar, demorei um pouco, eu meio que descobri organicamente que bom … o que era ISTAART. E esse foi um resumo muito bom. Obrigada. E eu gosto do novo título PEERS, é isso, é realmente ótimo.

Dra. Anna Volkmer:

Adam, mencionei na minha introdução que temos uma noção dos objetivos gerais do PEERS PIA, mas você pode nos contar sobre esses grandes projetos em que o grupo está trabalhando, por favor?

Adam Smith:

Nossos grandes e empolgantes projetos e eu me sinto sempre um pouco como um impostor, porque provavelmente sou a pessoa mais velha em todo o projecto. Sinto que sou como um falso pesquisador em início de carreira fora de nós. Isso é me impor aos pesquisadores em início de carreira.

Adam Smith:

Mas então, quando começamos nosso PIA, uma das coisas que realmente queríamos fazer era ter certeza de que fornecíamos alguma ajuda e suporte realmente prático, prático, e não apenas ser outra pessoa apenas adicionando ao espaço de coisas no início da carreira os pesquisadores precisam estar cientes. E eu acho … então tínhamos algumas ideias sobre o que precisava ser feito, mas reconhecemos que os desafios que os pesquisadores em início de carreira enfrentam e a ajuda de que precisam nem sempre são os mesmos. É diferente em diferentes partes do mundo. Ele muda em diferentes estágios da carreira. Depende dos diferentes campos de pesquisa em que você trabalha.

Adam Smith:

E acho que queríamos ter certeza … um pouco como meu … no meu trabalho diurno, trabalhei para um pesquisador de demência. Queríamos ter certeza de que poderíamos ajudar a todos, quer você esteja trabalhando com ciência fundamental ou pesquisa de cuidados. Portanto, temos essa ideia em que havia temas comuns, mas sabíamos que todos provavelmente precisavam de uma ajuda diferente em diferentes desafios. Por isso, queríamos nos envolver e ouvir o que a comunidade tinha a dizer e quais eram os problemas, e também ter uma ideia do apoio que já existia.

Adam Smith:

E, como seria de esperar, como grupo de pesquisadores, somos mais orientados por dados e surgiu uma pesquisa porque todo mundo adora uma boa … outra pesquisa! Mas isso é um pouco diferente. Então é aqui que a pesquisa entrou, porque eu acho que ao realizá-la em todo o mundo, podemos ouvir quais são os desafios que os pesquisadores em início de carreira enfrentam, começar a ter uma noção de qual apoio eles recebem em diferentes partes do mundo, onde os obstáculos estão com suas carreiras, quais são os verdadeiros problemas. Portanto, não ouvimos apenas quais são os desafios, mas também o que tem sido feito e feito bem. E então podemos pegar o resultado disso, combiná-lo com algum outro trabalho, do qual Sara falará para tentar e tanto orientar nossas próprias ofertas de apoio, mas também produzir orientações para instituições de pesquisa e financiadores, para que possam esperançosamente, melhorem suas próprias políticas para apoiar o que os ECRs realmente precisam.

Adam Smith:

E a Deborah Oliveira também do Brasil que também trabalhou em Nottingham, fez um ótimo paper que foi bastante inspirador ano passado, onde ela meio que teve uma noção de como começar esse trabalho. E acho que aconteceu em um momento em que também estávamos examinando isso.

Adam Smith:

Então, a pesquisa sai hoje. Lindsay também falará sobre a pesquisa, mas esse é o tipo de inspiração real e é por isso que as pessoas deveriam fazer isso. Acho que, ao preencher a pesquisa, faremos uma diferença real no suporte que forneceremos no futuro e, esperançosamente, forneceremos alguma orientação e melhoraremos o ambiente em que todos trabalhamos.

Dra. Anna Volkmer:

Isso é ótimo. E é quase uma pesquisa centrada na pessoa para aplicar um pouco dessa conversa sobre cuidados com a demência. Isso é emocionante.

Adam Smith:

Gosto de pensar que sim.

Dra. Anna Volkmer:

Sim, absolutamente. Quer dizer, eu acho que … sim … é uma maneira muito útil de fazer isso porque, como você disse, todos nós viemos de origens diferentes, idades diferentes, estamos em estágios diferentes, países diferentes. Lindsey, você pode nos contar um pouco mais sobre esta pesquisa?

Dra. Lindsay Welikovitch:

Sim, com certeza. Então, nós cinco meio que colocamos nossos cérebros coletivos juntos e descobrimos todos os tópicos que alguém poderia imaginar, é o que esperamos. Mas estávamos realmente interessados ​​em entender quais experiências profissionais e circunstâncias de vida levam um pesquisador em início de carreira a seguir uma carreira em pesquisas sobre demência. E que combinação de fatores pessoais e profissionais pode contribuir para um ECR realmente ter sucesso em seus respectivos campos e indústrias. E o mais importante, se os jovens pesquisadores se sentem realizados em suas funções atuais e estão otimistas sobre o futuro e as pesquisas sobre demência.

Dra. Lindsay Welikovitch:

E, finalmente, como Adam disse, nosso objetivo é usar todas essas informações para ajudar a orientar a política futura e, esperançosamente, convencer a atual geração de estudantes, neurocientistas e médicos de que a pesquisa da demência é uma área de estudo extremamente importante e valiosa para seguir.

Dra. Lindsay Welikovitch:

Então, nós cinco, acho que trazemos perspectivas bastante singulares porque estamos em estágios de carreira completamente diferentes, treinamento científico. Temos antecedentes pessoais completamente diferentes. Nenhum de nós é do mesmo país. E acho que Beth, Wagner e eu também dissemos que, no momento em que estávamos formulando a pesquisa, estávamos no meio de uma transição de carreira bastante significativa. Portanto, alguns dos tópicos evoluem em tempo real à medida que os vivíamos. Portanto, podemos certamente simpatizar com alguns dos participantes, provavelmente, enquanto estão realizando a pesquisa.

Dra. Lindsay Welikovitch:

E, finalmente, uma vez que reunimos, basicamente, todos os tópicos em que podíamos pensar, testamos a pesquisa com o resto do nosso comitê executivo e recrutamos quase um número excessivo de participantes para fazer um teste beta do questionário. E esses eram ECRs dedicados que também estavam em estágios de carreira completamente diferentes em diferentes partes do mundo e que também falam idiomas diferentes. E eles forneceram um feedback muito útil sobre como certas questões podem ser melhoradas e sugestões para questões que ainda não havíamos pensado e que não havíamos considerado. Portanto, esperamos ter sido capazes de integrar com sucesso seus comentários e sugestões. E sua contribuição foi realmente inestimável para nos ajudar a garantir que a pesquisa fosse o mais acessível possível e que possamos extrair o máximo possível de dados e informações úteis dos entrevistados.

Dra. Lindsay Welikovitch:

Então, como disse Adam, a pesquisa é lançada hoje e, como bons cientistas, só tem sucesso se tivermos um tamanho de amostra adequado e dados suficientes de todos. Então, e isso depende completamente de você. Portanto, encorajamos a todos em todos os estágios de carreira, quer você esteja apenas começando na graduação ou estágio de professor assistente ou qualquer outro lugar, a participar para ajudar a efetuar mudanças e também para incentivar seus colegas a preencherem a pesquisa também.

Dra. Lindsay Welikovitch:

A pesquisa está disponível no site do dementia researcher, eu estava debatendo se deveria ou não soletrar a URL, mas não irei. Se você simplesmente acessar o dementia researcher, um URL e, no final, apenas colocar uma barra e uma pesquisa, você será capaz de encontrá-lo facilmente, com sorte.

Dra. Lindsay Welikovitch:

Portanto, estou realmente ansiosa para ver o que os participantes vão responder. Esperançosamente, cobrimos todas as áreas. Acho que as pessoas vão descobrir que sim. Então sim.

Dra. Anna Volkmer:

E quanto tempo … a grande questão é … quanto tempo vai demorar para as pessoas? As pessoas estão ouvindo e pensando, meu Deus, eu quero fazer isso, mas estou sem tempo. Quanto tempo eles precisam?

Dra. Lindsay Welikovitch:

Certo. Portanto, esculpimos cuidadosamente esta pesquisa de forma que não houvesse perguntas redundantes e que as respostas das pessoas ditariam quais perguntas viriam depois. Portanto, deve demorar cerca de 20, 25 minutos, esperamos. Sim. E é … quer dizer, para nós, parecia muito, mas como dissemos, tentamos incluir o máximo possível para que fosse muito fácil para as pessoas fazerem. Portanto, deve levar apenas 20, 25 minutos. E se você quiser pausar e voltar, acredito que é um recurso também. Portanto, se você está no laboratório, deseja apenas fazer isso rapidamente, também é uma possibilidade.

Adam Smith:

Sim. Levamos nove meses para fazer as perguntas. Esta não é uma pesquisa que lançamos rapidamente há uma semana. Acho que sim … começamos a trabalhar nisso em janeiro? Parece-

Dra. Lindsay Welikovitch:

Não diga a eles como a salsicha é feita, Adam!

Adam Smith:

Desculpa!

Wagner Brum:

20 minutos é como um instante em comparação com-

Adam Smith:

Sim, é um curto período de tempo, tem muito trabalho nessa pesquisa. Mas acho que você fez uma observação muito boa, Anna e Lindsey. E Anna, como especialista em comunicação, você está lutando pelos diferentes idiomas, tentando ter certeza de que também poderia chegar a uma forma de palavras que faria sentido se você estivesse lendo isso no Brasil ou na Austrália ou na Europa ou nos Estados Unidos. Foi bastante complicado.

Dra. Anna Volkmer:

E estávamos debatendo sobre a tradução, não é? Sobre, na verdade, isso é complicado, mas pelo que eu entendi no momento, é tudo em inglês. Oh, isso é realmente útil. Então está em inglês. São 20 minutos. Você pode pausar e reiniciar. Por favor, vá e faça. Porque vocês fizeram um trabalho muito completo. Mas Sara, Adam mencionou que a pesquisa é apenas um trabalho que vai contribuir para a orientação que todos vocês esperam produzir. Então, conte-nos sobre o trabalho político que você está liderando.

Dra. Sara Bartels:

A pesquisa é um pouco como de baixo para cima e o trabalho da política é de cima para baixo, se você quiser compará-lo dessa forma. Portanto, nosso objetivo é identificar que tipo de planos e estratégias políticas existem em todo o mundo para apoiar pesquisadores em início de carreira no campo da demência. Primeiro, veremos se um país tem um plano ou estratégia para a demência ou não, e depois também identificaremos os maiores órgãos de financiamento para a demência.

Dra. Sara Bartels:

E, em segundo lugar, revisaremos, eles apoiam especificamente ECRs de pesquisadores em início de carreira ou são mais amplos para pesquisas em geral para um tópico específico? E a ideia é fornecer um guia de melhores práticas, potencialmente junto com o Conselho Mundial de Demência e outras organizações para identificar as melhores práticas e melhorar o campo. Também da perspectiva de cima para baixo, sabemos, é claro, que o início da carreira é difícil em muitos campos, mas talvez haja alguns bons exemplos por aí que podemos apoiar e, em seguida, circular ao redor do mundo por meio desse trabalho de política.

Dra. Anna Volkmer:

Então, há algum país que você conhece que já implementou esse tipo de estratégia contra a demência?

Dra. Sara Bartels:

Um recurso que identifiquei que foi muito útil para começar … estamos apenas começando este projeto agora, está em estágios muito iniciais, foi o melhor site da Europa. Eles têm uma visão geral dos países europeus e das estratégias. E lá, eu vi que alguns países realmente não têm estratégias – Estônia, Letônia, Turquia. Eles não têm estratégias para demência e, portanto, não tenho certeza de como os pesquisadores em início de carreira são apoiados nesses países. Talvez eles tenham outros sistemas de suporte que possamos identificar, mas por enquanto é realmente sim, é um tópico muito interessante para analisar e ver o que está acontecendo ao redor do mundo.

Dra. Anna Volkmer:

Absolutamente. E é por isso que acho que seria tão útil distribuir a pesquisa a todos esses países que você … que acabou de nomear.

Dra. Anna Volkmer:

Mas agora Wagner, você mencionou que você é de, originalmente do Brasil e a América do Sul é um dos lugares que realmente parece estar contribuindo muito com o campo de pesquisa em demência. Como você acha que o trabalho de sua PIA e a política de trabalho assim podem realmente ajudar os ECRs?

Wagner Brum:

Então sim, eu realmente acho que a América do Sul tem contribuído muito para a pesquisa sobre demência recentemente. Quer dizer, agora há pouco no AAIC, tivemos a plenária com o professor Nitrini. Mas também conhecemos outros países da América do Sul, por exemplo, temos a Professora Miia Kivipelto na Argentina fazendo o estudo FINGER. E, por exemplo, o professor Yakeel Quiroz, apesar de estar em Boston, lidera um trabalho incrível com as famílias colombianas afetadas pelo Alzheimer.

Wagner Brum:

Então, para nós que estamos sempre lendo e nos engajando com a literatura principalmente europeia e norte-americana, é muito bom também ser e sentir que a América do Sul também está começando a entrar na cena. E eu acho que nosso PIA pode realmente fazer a diferença nesse sentido, porque quero dizer, na minha experiência, o que eu senti que realmente fez a diferença na minha carreira como pesquisador em início de carreira é estar conectado com o que está acontecendo na comunidade de pesquisa internacional e estar conectado com os PEERS na comunidade de pesquisa internacional.

Wagner Brum:

Quer dizer, quando entrei no meu laboratório em 2018, eles estavam discutindo a diretriz que saiu este ano, naquele ano. Então, por exemplo, quando estamos em países fora da Europa ou da América do Norte, é ainda mais difícil para você não ficar restrito a publicações, periódicos e literatura nacionais, e realmente acompanhar o que está acontecendo em outros lugares. Então, para mim, saber o que estava acontecendo era crucial. E então continuamos trabalhando nessa direção.

Wagner Brum:

E então no AAIC 19, eu simplesmente me senti parte de algo quando cheguei lá. Quer dizer, estávamos estudando o que estava acontecendo. Estávamos fazendo pesquisas nessa linha e havia várias outras pessoas fazendo o mesmo. Então eu acho que mesmo quando Adam me convidou para fazer parte da PIA, eu senti que isso é algo em que acredito, porque conectar-me com a comunidade de pesquisa e conectar-se com o que está acontecendo foi o que mudou o jogo para mim como um pesquisador em início de carreira .

Wagner Brum:

Então, eu realmente espero que possamos fazer isso com os PEERS, então estamos pensando em várias maneiras de ajudar a comunidade de pesquisadores em início de carreira com ação. Então, primeiro pensamos como na era da pandemia óbvia, coisas que podemos fazer, por exemplo, webinars, estamos fazendo uma série de métodos, webinars para envolver pesquisadores em início de carreira para compartilhar suas experiências.

Wagner Brum:

E é claro que teremos a oportunidade e agora há a pesquisa que todos esperamos que todos possam ajudar a preencher e pedir a seus colegas que completem para entender que tipo de ações necessárias que podemos realizar.

Wagner Brum:

E, por exemplo, da perspectiva da América do Sul, algo que eu sei que … é algo em que se pode investir ainda mais, mas isso vai, com certeza, ver que é algo que está funcionando, por exemplo, as bolsas de viagem. Porque todo mundo que está na América do Sul aproveita e tem bolsa de viagem para ir a outras conferências e se conectar. Tenho certeza de que todos pensam que é isso que faz toda a diferença. Então é esse tipo de coisa que queremos saber, como o que está funcionando e o que … podemos até colocar mais energia e financiamento para conectar todos.

Dra. Anna Volkmer:

Sim. As conexões de rede são a chave, não são? Estou curioso com a pesquisa, falamos sobre a América do Sul, falamos sobre a Europa – há algum outro país ou continente de onde você gostaria de receber respondentes? Ou você não falou sobre isso em particular?

Adam Smith:

É complicado, não é? Quero dizer, porque acho que proporcionalmente é claro que existem, acho que você gostaria de alguma representação proporcional de todo o mundo. Eu esperava uma resposta maior dos Estados Unidos, onde há mais pesquisadores, e da Europa. Mas eu acho que há … porque há coisas diferentes acontecendo em diferentes partes do mundo. Sabemos que a pesquisa na Nigéria ou na China e na Austrália tem um foco e ênfase diferente, talvez em outras partes do mundo.

Adam Smith:

Portanto, não, acho muito importante tentarmos obter contribuições. E como eu disse, isso não é apenas descobrir quais são os problemas para os pesquisadores da Nova Zelândia em comparação com a Europa, embora isso em si seja interessante. Mas acho que estou realmente querendo saber o que não é um problema para alguém. Portanto, talvez não haja os mesmos gargalos na Austrália em comparação com os EUA, o que nos permite mudar nosso guidance. E pode ser que o resultado disso não seja um único guia. Eu sei que Beth vai falar sobre isso em um minuto, mas na verdade nos permite definir que tipo de suporte é necessário em diferentes partes do mundo, e então sermos capazes de responder a isso. E, esperançosamente, como uma organização global, a Associação de Alzheimer e nossa PIA, somos capazes de responder a isso.

Dra. Anna Volkmer:

E então na minha opinião, eu gostaria de divulgar isso para pesquisadores vindos do tipo de mundo da saúde para a pesquisa. Porque eu acho que certamente existem diferentes gargalos, apenas por exemplo, o AAIC, eu não acho que houve mais do que um punhado de fonoaudiólogos, que é a minha disciplina, que compareceram e ainda assim o Wagner acabou de falar como é uma maneira realmente maravilhosa de se conectar com as pessoas, quase sua família de pessoas que estão fazendo a mesma pesquisa.

Dra. Anna Volkmer:

E então sim, acho que seria realmente interessante ler os resultados, mas Beth, que outras coisas sua PIA planeja fazer no próximo ano, além desta pesquisa?

Dra. Beth Shaaban:

Sim, eu acho que isso também se encaixa muito bem com o que você e Adam estavam conversando com respostas de todo o mundo. Portanto, temos sido muito intencionais em nosso … quando estávamos formando nosso comitê executivo no ano passado, para que tivéssemos um representante de cada continente fora da Antártica. E achamos que isso é muito importante porque estamos entusiasmados com o fato de que essas lideranças do continente podem realmente nos ajudar a implementar a pesquisa em sua parte do mundo, e eles saberão mais localmente, quais são as outras associações profissionais com as quais podemos nos conectar e quais são as necessidades dos investigadores em início de carreira nessa área?

Dra. Beth Shaaban:

Então, estamos empolgados com as lideranças do continente no próximo ano, reunindo grupos de trabalho do continente. E acreditamos que isso realmente nos permitirá adaptar melhor os recursos que oferecemos aos pesquisadores em início de carreira.

Dra. Beth Shaaban:

Também estamos entusiasmados com uma das coisas que Wagner mencionou. Portanto, nossa série de webinars chamada de Methods Club. Para cada Methods Club, identificamos uma pesquisa ou método analítico de interesse para pesquisadores de demência em início de carreira. E cada webinar é presidido por um não especialista que realmente deseja aprender mais sobre o assunto, porque sentimos que eles saberão quais perguntas fazer e quais palavras não serão compreendidas por todos os presentes. Temos de duas a três apresentações de pesquisadores em início de carreira e, em seguida, incluímos de um a dois especialistas experientes na área para que possam ajudar a responder às perguntas e fornecer feedback aos apresentadores.

Dra. Beth Shaaban:

Então nós já seguramos aquele, eu acho que o Wagner mencionou, era sobre biomarcadores de biofluido. Foi muito bem atendido. Direi que houve um interesse muito grande da Ásia, da China. A gente sabe que lá foi muito bem atendido. E então há um apetite por mais recursos como este. E você ouviu de Sara sobre a revisão da política. E, finalmente, estamos interessados ​​em desenvolver mais suporte de carreira, especificamente por meio de um blog de suporte de carreira e melhorias no centro de carreiras no site da ISTAARTS. Essas são as coisas que nos entusiasmam no próximo ano.

Dra. Anna Volkmer:

Eles são emocionantes. Eles parecem coisas das quais eu poderia me beneficiar. Eu serei-

Dra. Beth Shaaban:

Eu sei. E egoisticamente queremos nos beneficiar disso também.

Dra. Anna Volkmer:

Sim, absolutamente. Eu estarei nesses workshops de métodos e estarei acompanhando as coisas de suporte de carreira.

Dra. Anna Volkmer:

E agora estamos quase sem tempo, mas Adam, nós conversamos muito sobre isso hoje, e eu só quero que nos concentremos nos pontos-chave. Lembre-nos das principais lições que você deseja que nossos ouvintes adotem agora.

Adam Smith:

  1. Portanto, basta acessar dementiaresearcher.nihr.ac.uk/survey e preencher nossa pesquisa. Precisamos de tantas pessoas de todo o mundo para fazer isso em todos os estágios da carreira, ambas as pessoas trabalhando em pesquisas sobre demência agora, ou se você já fez, mas por algum motivo decidiu sair nos últimos dois anos … porque eu acho queremos entender por que as pessoas também saíram. E isso vem de todas as áreas, desde pessoas trabalhando em um pós-doutorado de MSC ou PhD, como Lindsay explicou, até o tipo de professores juniores, eu acho.

Adam Smith:

Vá para a pesquisa dementiaresearcher.nihr.ac.uk/survey. Receio que não haja outra recompensa além de saber que você ajudou. É claro que publicaremos os resultados também em um jornal acadêmico. Portanto, pretendemos publicar os resultados o mais rápido possível. E eles vão, seus pontos de vista realmente importarão e continuarão a informar essa orientação.

Adam Smith:

Participe do nosso ISTAART PIA também. Se você for ao ISTAART, terá participação na conferência Neuroscience Next, que também foi mencionada hoje. Isso é gratuito para membros ISTAART. Você pode participar de nosso PIA e acessar todos os webinars. Existem literalmente dezenas de webinars todas as semanas e todas as gravações porque ninguém tem tempo para assistir a tantos webinars, mas você também tem coisas como … você tem acesso a Alzheimer e demência, acho que de graça também e vários outros benefícios. Então, junte-se ao nosso PIA.

Adam Smith:

Haverá oportunidades de se envolver nesses grupos de trabalho do continente que foram mencionados antes. Portanto, onde quer que você esteja no mundo, haverá um lugar para você em um de nossos grupos de trabalho do continente, seja qual for o campo de descoberta em que você trabalhe. Então, junte-se ao ISTAART e ao nosso PIA e haverá uma convocação para essas associações, tenho certeza, em um de nossos boletins antes do Natal. Então esse é o principal, eu acho, e deixe-nos saber se você deseja se envolver. Esperamos que os resultados sejam úteis.

Dra. Anna Volkmer:

Então diga, o incentivo é completar a pesquisa e isso vai ajudar outros no futuro. Isso é realmente bom. Obrigado, Adam.

Dra. Anna Volkmer:

E para que todos possam ouvir, todos os links de que você precisa estarão incluídos no texto que acompanha o programa. Então eu acho que é tudo o que temos para hoje. Obrigado novamente aos nossos convidados, Beth, Sara, Lindsay, Wagner e Adam. Temos todos os painelistas de hoje no site, incluindo detalhes de suas contas no Twitter. Então, por favor, dê uma olhada.

Dra. Anna Volkmer:

Finalmente, lembre-se de curtir, se inscrever em qualquer aplicativo que estiver ouvindo e lembre-se de visitar o site do demênci researcher, onde publicamos novos conteúdos todos os dias de carreiras e blogs de ciências, listas de empregos, chamadas de financiamento e eventos, e muito mais mais. Ah, e meus próprios blogs também, um recentemente sobre como seguir em frente com minha carreira. Portanto, foi ótimo ouvir todas as dicas e sugestões que você compartilhou hoje. Agora é isso por enquanto. Tenha um ótimo dia. Obrigado a todos.

Voice Over:

Trazido a você por dementiaresearcher.nihr.ac.uk em associação com a Alzheimer’s Research UK e a Alzheimer’s Society, apoiando pesquisadores de demência em início de carreira em todo o mundo.

FIM

Gostou do que ouviu? Reveja, curta e compartilhe nosso podcast – e não esqueça de se inscrever para garantir que você nunca perca um episódio.

Se você gostaria de compartilhar suas próprias experiências ou discutir sua pesquisa em um blog ou podcast, escreva para adam.smith@nihr.ac.uk ou encontre-nos no twitter @dem_researcher

Você pode encontrar nosso podcast no iTunes , SoundCloud e Spotify (e na maioria dos aplicativos de podcast) – nossos blogs narrados agora também estão disponíveis como podcast.

Este podcast é apresentado a você em associação com a Alzheimer’s Research UK e a Alzheimer’s Society, a quem agradecemos por seu apoio contínuo.

Observe que esta pesquisa foi aprovada pelo Comitê de Ética em Pesquisa da University College de Londres. Se você tiver alguma dúvida, entre em contato com Adam Smith, Diretor do Programa – adam.smith@ucl.ac.uk . 

Thank you to Tathiana Santana for her support in translating this blog.


DEMENTIA RESEARCHER PODCAST - Bi-weekly wherever you get your podcasts

Like what you hear? Please review, like, and share our podcast – and don’t forget to subscribe to ensure you never miss an episode.

If you would like to share your own experiences or discuss your research in a blog or on a podcast, drop us a line to adam.smith@nihr.ac.uk or find us on twitter @dem_researcher

You can find our podcast on iTunes, SoundCloud and Spotify (and most podcast apps) – our narrated blogs are now also available as a podcast.

This podcast is brought to you in association with Alzheimer’s Research UK and Alzheimer’s Society, who we thank for their ongoing support.


Please note this survey has been approved by the University College London Research Ethics Committee. If you have any questions please contact Adam Smith, Programme Director – adam.smith@ucl.ac.uk.

Leave a Reply

Translate »